Conquent: Without Limits
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Kristen Fife's Blog

Laborer? Contractor? Retail Associate? Yes, You *DO* Need A Resume!

2010-01-01 11:15:25
Shortcut URL: http://t.conquent.com/YF00

The last few days I've been working on a skilled trade opening for a Floorlayer. I'm amazed at the number of people that find the position online, send me email, yet don't have or don't bother to include a resume. EVERYONE that has a job should have a basic resume. It isn't difficult to write one, and it doesn't need to be elaborate. But these days, business practices dictate that you should have a full resume. Whether you are an electrician, plumber, janitor, short order cook, or retail associate, having a current resume is vital to increase your chances of finding a job. There are several reasons why.

1) It shows that you know how to communicate effectively in English.
2) A resume clearly lays out your skills and employment history for an employer to see.
3) You are presenting a more professional profile to a potential employer
4) Any business involved with the federal, state, county, or city government *requires* a resume to evaluate candidates for positions.
5) A resume is an excellent way to track your employment history for purposes of filling out applications.

Putting together a "blue collar" resume is no different than any other. The same pitfalls should be avoided as you would for a profession such an accountant or a lawyer.

Full contact information (name, phone number/s, email address, city and state of residence; street address is optional)

A nice transition to your employment history is a professional summary detailing any licenses you have (by state and license number), specific industry/job skills with the number of years you have been practicing them, and any specialized training (NOT your HS or college education!) you have received.

Then, list out your employers *in reverse chronologic order*.

Company, location (City/State/Province), years of employment, your title.
Brief desription of your main job duties or projects for that employer.

Education
HS/College, course of study, and degree/diploma achieved.

You should not put your references on your resume. You do not need a generic objective, it wastes space. A cover letter telling me you have 15 years as a journeyman carpenter is NOT a resume. It does not need to be one page or shorter, it should generally be no longer than two pages if you have more than 7 years of experience.

Please, please PLEASE do not use a functional resume. It does not give hiring managers and HR professionals the information we need in a way that we can make sense of. And please, do not use vague, trite words and phrases to describe your career. Be precise, targeted and contextual. Do NOT just cut and paste the same job duties under every job heading. You should NOT be doing the same thing for every different employer. If you are, you are not growing as a professional. Most of all, use proper grammar and punctuation with perfect spelling. There is absolutely no excuse for misspelled words on a resume.



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NextJenHR: Re: Laborer? Contractor? Retail Associate? Yes, You *DO* Need A Resume!
2010-01-02 12:05:19

Amen! Whatever your profession, show that you are a professional!

As someone who has recruited for a variety of levels, industries and career paths, it's important to show that you do have an interest and are vested in your career. From the point of submitting your resume, show that you have integrity and work ethic. Show some pride for who you are and what you have accomplished.

I'm not looking for the best resume in the stack. I'm looking for someone who from their resume shows that they have the knowledge, skills, abilities and characteristics of someone who can get the job done right!


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